Some genius created a blank song to avoid his phones horrible autoplay feature

Prepare for the sweet sounds of silence.
Image: Shutterstock / fongbeerredhot

At long last, one of the greatest #FirstWorldProblems to plague this tech-savvy generation has been solved and it’s all thanks to a song.

As anyone with a fairly new vehicle knows, within seconds of plugging in your phone to charge or play music through the car’s stereo, passengers are forced to listen to the first song that’s listed alphabetically in the device’s music library.

In the grand scheme of life it’s a small issue, we know. But it’s still an irritating, monotonous, and often embarrassing one that seemed unavoidable … that is until one fed up genius, Samir Mezrahi, figured out a way to intervene the inevitable autoplay: a blank song.

Not to be confused with T. Swift’s timeless track Blank Space, Mezrahi’s track is literally nearly 10 minutes of gorgeous silence. It’s also titled “A a a a a Very Good Song” to ensure it always remains at the top of your alphabetically ordered library.

So now when you plug your phone into a car, you have at least 10 calming minutes to select the perfect travel tracks instead of suffering through the first 30 seconds of “A.C. Newman On The Table” from Music From The O.C. Mix 4 for approximately the 764th time while screaming at the world.

The track, released Aug. 7, can be purchased for 99 cents and has already received some rave review on iTunes. Die-hard music fans have dubbed the silent banger “life changing” and “an objective masterpiece.”

Image: screengrab/itunes

And for those of you still asking yourself why you would pay for 10 minutes of no sound, it seems like a small price to pay for freedom especially if you have Ed Sheeran’s “The A Team” on your phone.

A a a a a Very Good Song, indeed.

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